“Flipped” Classroom: Benefits Versus Challenges for Communicative Sciences and Disorders Faculty and Students “Flipped” classrooms are rooted in the need to prepare students for the rigors of today's workplace. The model facilitates active, engaged learners, who take responsibility for developing knowledge and skills necessary to be professionally competitive. Implementation defies the traditional culture of education, posing challenges for both instructors and students. This ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2015
“Flipped” Classroom: Benefits Versus Challenges for Communicative Sciences and Disorders Faculty and Students
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patricia J. Tattersall
    School of Allied Health and Communicative Disorders, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois
  • Disclosure: Financial: Patricia J. Tattersall has no financial interests to disclose.
    Disclosure: Financial: Patricia J. Tattersall has no financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Patricia J. Tattersall has no nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Patricia J. Tattersall has no nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Article
Article   |   June 01, 2015
“Flipped” Classroom: Benefits Versus Challenges for Communicative Sciences and Disorders Faculty and Students
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, June 2015, Vol. 18, 4-15. doi:10.1044/ihe18.1.4
History: Received October 22, 2014 , Revised February 24, 2015 , Accepted March 17, 2015
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, June 2015, Vol. 18, 4-15. doi:10.1044/ihe18.1.4
History: Received October 22, 2014; Revised February 24, 2015; Accepted March 17, 2015

“Flipped” classrooms are rooted in the need to prepare students for the rigors of today's workplace. The model facilitates active, engaged learners, who take responsibility for developing knowledge and skills necessary to be professionally competitive. Implementation defies the traditional culture of education, posing challenges for both instructors and students. This pilot study introduced students in two communication sciences and disorders classes—one undergraduate and one graduate—to the flipped model. Although undergraduate students were significantly more open to online instruction than the graduate students, both groups valued the in-class activities similarly. Students' views of online learning significantly and positively correlated with their openness to enroll in a flipped or blended course. Subjective comments made by both groups of students indicated that they found the format challenging, yet the time dedicated to hands-on activities rather than lecture supported the learning and application of the material as well as provided practice with collaboration. Further research is needed to determine if the flipped classroom significantly improves global skills, content knowledge, and an openness to inquiry in students enrolled in communication sciences and disorders programs.

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