Bilingual and Monolingual Students' Perceptions of the CSD Major: A Qualitative Study There is a growing demand for bilingual services in speech-language pathology and audiology. To meet this growing demand, and given their critical role in the recruitment of more bilingual professionals, higher education institutions need to know more about bilingual students' impression of Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) as a major. ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2015
Bilingual and Monolingual Students' Perceptions of the CSD Major: A Qualitative Study
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Flora Keshishian
    Department of Rhetoric, Communication and Theatre, St. John's University
  • Rebecca Wiseheart
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, St. John's University, Queens, NY
  • Disclosure: Financial: Flora Keshishian and Rebecca Wiseheart have no financial interests to disclose.
    Disclosure: Financial: Flora Keshishian and Rebecca Wiseheart have no financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Flora Keshishian has previously published on this topic, some of this work is referenced in this paper. Rebecca Wiseheart has no nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Flora Keshishian has previously published on this topic, some of this work is referenced in this paper. Rebecca Wiseheart has no nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Professional Issues & Training / Article
Article   |   June 01, 2015
Bilingual and Monolingual Students' Perceptions of the CSD Major: A Qualitative Study
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, June 2015, Vol. 18, 16-31. doi:10.1044/ihe18.1.16
History: Received October 16, 2014 , Revised March 16, 2015 , Accepted March 17, 2015
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, June 2015, Vol. 18, 16-31. doi:10.1044/ihe18.1.16
History: Received October 16, 2014; Revised March 16, 2015; Accepted March 17, 2015

There is a growing demand for bilingual services in speech-language pathology and audiology. To meet this growing demand, and given their critical role in the recruitment of more bilingual professionals, higher education institutions need to know more about bilingual students' impression of Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) as a major. The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate bilingual and monolingual undergraduate students' perceptions of the CSD major. One hundred and twenty-two students from a large university located in a highly multicultural metropolitan area responded to four open-ended questions aimed at discovering students' major areas of interest (and disinterest) as well as their motivations for pursuing a degree in CSD. Consistent with similar reports conducted outside the United States, students from this culturally diverse environment indicated choosing the major for altruistic reasons. A large percentage of participants were motivated by a desire to work with children, but not in a school setting. Although 42% of the participants were bilingual, few indicated an interest in taking an additional course in bilingual studies. Implications of these findings as well as practical suggestions for the recruitment of bilingual students are discussed.

Acknowledgements
The authors thank Dr. Nancy S. McGarr for her invaluable contribution to the beginning stages of the manuscript, and Martha Diaz for helping with inter-rater reliability; and to Dr. Patrick R. Walden for commenting on the final version of the manuscript.
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