Preservice Knowledge and Training in Autism Spectrum Disorders In this study, the author surveyed speech-language pathology students’ knowledge about and training in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A total of 97 students (74 undergraduates and 23 graduate students) from 4 universities in Mississippi completed the survey. Although most students reported that they had taken at least one class in ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2013
Preservice Knowledge and Training in Autism Spectrum Disorders
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Johanna R. Price
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Western Carolina University, Cullowhee, NC
  • Disclosure: Financial: Johanna R. Price is a professor in the department of communication sciences and disorders at Western Carolina University.
    Disclosure: Financial: Johanna R. Price is a professor in the department of communication sciences and disorders at Western Carolina University.×
    Nonfinancial: Johanna R. Price has previously published in this subject area.
    Nonfinancial: Johanna R. Price has previously published in this subject area.×
Article Information
Special Populations / Autism Spectrum / School-Based Settings / Professional Issues & Training
Article   |   October 01, 2013
Preservice Knowledge and Training in Autism Spectrum Disorders
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, October 2013, Vol. 16, 71-80. doi:10.1044/ihe16.2.71
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, October 2013, Vol. 16, 71-80. doi:10.1044/ihe16.2.71

In this study, the author surveyed speech-language pathology students’ knowledge about and training in autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A total of 97 students (74 undergraduates and 23 graduate students) from 4 universities in Mississippi completed the survey. Although most students reported that they had taken at least one class in which ASD was covered, few reported taking any classes in which ASD was the sole topic. One-half of the graduate students indicated that they had worked with clients with ASD in the university clinic. Graduate students generally demonstrated higher levels of knowledge about ASD than undergraduates. Students demonstrated low levels of knowledge regarding diagnostic criteria for ASD, the use of restricted diets and facilitated communication as evidence-based interventions for ASD, the presence of exceptional abilities in individuals with ASD, and the prevalence and genetic basis of ASD. The author discusses implications of these findings for university training programs.

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