Evaluation of Evidence in Evidence-Based Practice and How Library Science Can Help In this article, we describe how collaboration with our university librarian at San Francisco State University led to the integration of information literacy competency standards within our curriculum, as outlined by the American Library Association (ALA). The ALA standards are related to the evaluation of evidence, a key component of ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2009
Evaluation of Evidence in Evidence-Based Practice and How Library Science Can Help
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Laura Epstein
    San Francisco State University, San Francisco, California
  • Athena Nazario
    San Francisco State University, San Francisco, California
  • Betty Yu
    San Francisco State University, San Francisco, California
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Professional Issues & Training / Language Disorders / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2009
Evaluation of Evidence in Evidence-Based Practice and How Library Science Can Help
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, June 2009, Vol. 12, 32-41. doi:10.1044/ihe12.1.32
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, June 2009, Vol. 12, 32-41. doi:10.1044/ihe12.1.32
Abstract

In this article, we describe how collaboration with our university librarian at San Francisco State University led to the integration of information literacy competency standards within our curriculum, as outlined by the American Library Association (ALA). The ALA standards are related to the evaluation of evidence, a key component of evidence-based practice and these were infused across four courses in the communicative disorders program focused on language development and disorders. In particular, ALA Standard 3 stipulates that the student who is information literate evaluates information and its sources critically and incorporates selected information into his or her knowledge base and value system. The integration of Standard 3 within language disorders courses is described in detail. We anticipate that the infusion of information literacy skills related to the evaluation of evidence during academic training will make such skills an integral part of the clinical process for future clinicians.

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