Gifts From the Web: Mentoring Mentoring is a natural way for experienced faculty to give back to younger faculty or to graduate students. Mentoring can serve as a scaffold that provides for a successful transition in learning a range of new responsibilities and ways of doing the job right. For graduate students, finding the ... Bibliography
Bibliography  |   October 01, 2008
Gifts From the Web: Mentoring
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Howard Wilson
    West Texas A&M University, Canyon, TX
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Gifts From the Web
Bibliography   |   October 01, 2008
Gifts From the Web: Mentoring
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, October 2008, Vol. 11, 83-85. doi:10.1044/ihe11.2.83
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, October 2008, Vol. 11, 83-85. doi:10.1044/ihe11.2.83
Mentoring is a natural way for experienced faculty to give back to younger faculty or to graduate students. Mentoring can serve as a scaffold that provides for a successful transition in learning a range of new responsibilities and ways of doing the job right. For graduate students, finding the right mentor can make the difference between success and failure. Usually, a mentor will guide the graduate student through many decisions facing them as they learn to become professionals. For new faculty, a mentor can educate the person on the many unwritten rules that govern the department, college, and university. Mentoring at its' best is a process that benefits both individuals and forms a life-long support for personal and professional growth.
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