The Clinician Directed Hierarchy: A Clinical Training Tool Clinical supervisors in university based clinical settings are challenged by numerous tasks to promote the development of self-analysis and problem-solving skills of the clinical student (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, ASHA, 1985). The Clinician Directed Hierarchy is a clinical training tool that assists the clinical teaching process by directing the student clinician’s ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2008
The Clinician Directed Hierarchy: A Clinical Training Tool
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jill K. Duthie
    University of the Pacific, Stockton, CA
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2008
The Clinician Directed Hierarchy: A Clinical Training Tool
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, October 2008, Vol. 11, 56-60. doi:10.1044/ihe11.2.56
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, October 2008, Vol. 11, 56-60. doi:10.1044/ihe11.2.56
Abstract

Clinical supervisors in university based clinical settings are challenged by numerous tasks to promote the development of self-analysis and problem-solving skills of the clinical student (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, ASHA, 1985). The Clinician Directed Hierarchy is a clinical training tool that assists the clinical teaching process by directing the student clinician’s focus to a specific level of intervention. At each of five levels of intervention, the clinician develops an understanding of the client’s speech/language target behaviors and matches clinical support accordingly. Additionally, principles and activities of generalization are highlighted for each intervention level. Preliminary findings suggest this is a useful training tool for university clinical settings. An essential goal of effective clinical supervision is the provision of support and guidance in the student clinician’s development of independent clinical skills (Larson, 2007). The student clinician is challenged with identifying client behaviors in the therapeutic process and learning to match his or her instructions, models, prompts, reinforcement, and use of stimuli appropriately according to the client’s needs. In addition, the student clinician must be aware of techniques in the intervention process that will promote generalization of new communication behaviors. Throughout the intervention process, clinicians are charged with identifying appropriate target behaviors, quantifying the progress of the client’s acquisition of the targets, and making adjustments within and between sessions as necessary. Central to the development of clinical skills is the feedback provided by the clinical supervisor (Brasseur, 1989; Moss, 2007). Particularly in the early stages of clinical skills development, the supervisor is challenged with addressing numerous aspects of clinical performance and awareness, while ensuring the client’s welfare (Moss). To address the management of clinician and client behaviors while developing an understanding of the clinical intervention process, the University of the Pacific has developed and begun to implement the Clinician Directed Hierarchy.

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