Using a Web Page Design Activity to Promote Active Learning of Course Content in an Undergraduate Anatomy and Physiology Course The purpose of this study was to evaluate student perceptions of a Web page design activity as a learning activity in an undergraduate anatomy and physiology course. One class of undergraduate majors in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology who took part in CSD 1720: Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech Mechanism ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2009
Using a Web Page Design Activity to Promote Active Learning of Course Content in an Undergraduate Anatomy and Physiology Course
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patrick R. Walden
    St. John’s University, Staten Island, NY
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2009
Using a Web Page Design Activity to Promote Active Learning of Course Content in an Undergraduate Anatomy and Physiology Course
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, October 2009, Vol. 12, 53-58. doi:10.1044/ihe12.2.53
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, October 2009, Vol. 12, 53-58. doi:10.1044/ihe12.2.53
Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate student perceptions of a Web page design activity as a learning activity in an undergraduate anatomy and physiology course. One class of undergraduate majors in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology who took part in CSD 1720: Anatomy and Physiology of the Speech Mechanism at St. John’s University’s Staten Island Campus was solicited to voluntarily and anonymously complete an online survey regarding their perceptions of the utility of building a Web page to learn course content. Nine (34.6%) of the possible 26 students enrolled in the course completed the survey. Most respondents were freshmen or sophomores. No respondent indicated that he or she was technologically incompetent. Complete survey results were communicated in tabular format. Overall, student respondents to the survey indicated positive perceptions regarding the utility of building a Web page to enhance recall and understanding of course concepts in an undergraduate anatomy and physiology course. Recommendations for future research include the continued survey of future students to make a better-informed judgment regarding the use of this activity to improve student learning of course content.

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