Educating Other Professionals About What Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists Do Many academic programs provide courses and continuing education offerings that focus on a multidisciplinary approach to the evaluation and treatment of patients with various communication disorders. Some continuing education and academic courses offered by university programs focus on speech-language pathologists and audiologists developing collaborative relationships with other professionals in ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2001
Educating Other Professionals About What Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists Do
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Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2001
Educating Other Professionals About What Audiologists and Speech-Language Pathologists Do
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, June 2001, Vol. 4, 11-12. doi:10.1044/ihe4.1.11
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, June 2001, Vol. 4, 11-12. doi:10.1044/ihe4.1.11
Many academic programs provide courses and continuing education offerings that focus on a multidisciplinary approach to the evaluation and treatment of patients with various communication disorders. Some continuing education and academic courses offered by university programs focus on speech-language pathologists and audiologists developing collaborative relationships with other professionals in the treatment of individuals with communication disorders. In addition, students are often encouraged by faculty and clinical supervisors to develop treatment plans that involve other professions. Such a multidisciplinary focus can offer opportunities for audiologists and speech-language pathologists to educate other professionals about what we do and about how other professionals (e.g., teachers, other health care providers) and caregivers (e.g., family members, guardians) can help our clients maximize their communication and related skills. An important question, however, is “Should we educate others about what we do, and how they can best support, supplement, or reinforce our interventions, or teach them how to do what we do?” This distinction is a critical one for each educator to consider.
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