ASHA’s 2001 Research in Higher Education Mentoring Program For the third year, ASHA has provided funds for the Research in Higher Education Mentoring Program. This program was developed initially in 1999 and continued in year 2000 as one of ASHA’s strategies to address shortage of teacher/scholars in communication sciences and disorders in institutions of higher education across ... SIG News
SIG News  |   June 01, 2001
ASHA’s 2001 Research in Higher Education Mentoring Program
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Debra Bussaco
    Academic Affairs Office, ASHA, Rockville, MD
Article Information
SIG News
SIG News   |   June 01, 2001
ASHA’s 2001 Research in Higher Education Mentoring Program
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, June 2001, Vol. 4, 10-11. doi:10.1044/ihe4.1.10
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, June 2001, Vol. 4, 10-11. doi:10.1044/ihe4.1.10
For the third year, ASHA has provided funds for the Research in Higher Education Mentoring Program. This program was developed initially in 1999 and continued in year 2000 as one of ASHA’s strategies to address shortage of teacher/scholars in communication sciences and disorders in institutions of higher education across the nation. This year the program was co-sponsored by ASHA and the American Speech-Language Hearing Foundation (ASHF). The goal of the Research in Higher Education Mentoring Program is to provide undergraduate and master’s students with a one to two-week short-term mentoring experience with a teacher/researcher in a university setting. Students who apply for the program should have a strong interest in pursuing a PhD with the eventual goal of a career as a teacher-scholar in an academic program in communication sciences and disorders. Each student who applies for this short-term mentoring program is responsible for finding a mentor and developing a plan that would provide the student with opportunities to observe or participate in the mentor’s ongoing research activities. In addition, students are exposed to the daily responsibilities of a university professor. In the past 2 years, many of the mentors have provided students with an opportunity to interact with PhD students in their university programs, attend doctoral seminars, and assist doctoral students in their research activities. Such experiences help undergraduate and master’s students decide if they are interested in pursuing a PhD degree. Past student participants have reported gaining a positive and unique experience that has helped them make decisions about choosing a research and teaching career. Several students who participated in the 1999 or 2000 Research in Higher Education Mentoring Programs have enrolled in PhD programs in communication sciences and disorders.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.