Preparing Speech-Language Pathologists for Early Intervention in Community Settings: Putting Research Tools to Practice While there are multiple models for supervising student clinicians, the effectiveness of established models has generally been demonstrated within traditional clinical settings. There is a paucity of research and few curriculum tools for preparing students to work within the diverse community settings that serve as natural environments for young ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2005
Preparing Speech-Language Pathologists for Early Intervention in Community Settings: Putting Research Tools to Practice
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Juliann Woods
    Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
  • Jade Coston
    Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
  • Jessika Lawrence
    Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
  • Alisha Richmond
    Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
Article Information
Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2005
Preparing Speech-Language Pathologists for Early Intervention in Community Settings: Putting Research Tools to Practice
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, October 2005, Vol. 8, 3-6. doi:10.1044/ihe8.2.3
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, October 2005, Vol. 8, 3-6. doi:10.1044/ihe8.2.3
While there are multiple models for supervising student clinicians, the effectiveness of established models has generally been demonstrated within traditional clinical settings. There is a paucity of research and few curriculum tools for preparing students to work within the diverse community settings that serve as natural environments for young children (Paul-Brown & Caperton, 2001). Early intervention in community-based settings offers unique challenges for clinical education. Early intervention settings and models for service delivery necessitate that student clinicians learn to incorporate interventions flexibly, problem solve immediately, and plan collaboratively. The knowledge and skills that are essential to early intervention services in community-based settings include joining into routines, activities and schedules, embedding intervention, supporting social interactions with peers, arranging environments to support communication, consulting with team members, and sharing instructional information (Strain, McGee & Kohler, 2001). These competencies are generally taught didactically in coursework with little opportunity for guided practice and feedback in real world settings (Paul-Brown & Caperton, 2001). Limited comfort with clinical approaches in early intervention and little supervised training experience in the practice of collaboration and intervention in natural environments are frequently identified as barriers to implementation by practicing clinicians (Buysse & Wesley, 2005; Hanft, Rush, & Sheldon, 2004). It is likely that clinical educators find themselves questioning their capacity to supervise students in settings and service delivery models that they have little or no training or experience in as practicing clinicians as well. The following will describe a process evaluated at the Florida State University Department of Communication Disorders to support clinical educators and graduate students within early intervention settings.
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