Innovative Professor: Applying Transitional Self-Advocacy Videos in Clinical Education In clinical education, evaluation and intervention sessions are frequently videotaped to provide a means of assessment for student clinicians. The videotaped sessions are often shared between the student clinician and clinical supervisor in order to evaluate performance and, importantly, encourage student self-reflection. Clinical videotapes may also be used between ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2005
Innovative Professor: Applying Transitional Self-Advocacy Videos in Clinical Education
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jack Pickering
    College of St. Rose, Albany, NY
  • James Feeney
    College of St. Rose, Albany, NY
  • Mark Ylvisaker
    College of St. Rose, Albany, NY
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Regulatory, Legislative & Advocacy / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2005
Innovative Professor: Applying Transitional Self-Advocacy Videos in Clinical Education
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, June 2005, Vol. 8, 18-21. doi:10.1044/ihe8.1.18
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, June 2005, Vol. 8, 18-21. doi:10.1044/ihe8.1.18
In clinical education, evaluation and intervention sessions are frequently videotaped to provide a means of assessment for student clinicians. The videotaped sessions are often shared between the student clinician and clinical supervisor in order to evaluate performance and, importantly, encourage student self-reflection. Clinical videotapes may also be used between semesters to provide a transition from one student clinician to the next.
In 1997, The College of Saint Rose expanded on the benefits of traditional clinical videotaping by implementing a process called transitional self-advocacy videos. Ylvisaker, Szekeres, and Feeney (1998)  described transitional self-advocacy videos as a means of providing a meaningful context for children with disability to present themselves to new staff and to advocate for their own education and intervention. By participating in the planning of these videos, parents and others are helped to understand the client’s strengths and needs. Student clinicians and their client’s family members feel a sense of empowerment and gain valuable information about themselves by taking part in the videotaping process. Additionally, the clinician benefits by engaging in a highly relevant, collaborative project that focuses on the client’s individual goals and objectives. Feeney and Capo (2002)  described the successful application of transitional self-advocacy videos for individuals with traumatic brain injury.
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