Speech-Language Pathology Students’ Awareness of Linguistic and Cultural Differences This study examined 167 English-speaking speech-language pathology undergraduate and graduate students’ knowledge of linguistic and cultural differences associated with other dialects and languages. The knowledge of differences among cultures is essential for English-speaking practitioners working with second-language English- or dialect-speaking individuals with speech and/or language difficulties. It is necessary ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2004
Speech-Language Pathology Students’ Awareness of Linguistic and Cultural Differences
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sandra Levey
    Lehman College of the City University of New York, Bronx, NY
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   October 01, 2004
Speech-Language Pathology Students’ Awareness of Linguistic and Cultural Differences
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, October 2004, Vol. 7, 2-5. doi:10.1044/ihe7.2.2
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, October 2004, Vol. 7, 2-5. doi:10.1044/ihe7.2.2
This study examined 167 English-speaking speech-language pathology undergraduate and graduate students’ knowledge of linguistic and cultural differences associated with other dialects and languages. The knowledge of differences among cultures is essential for English-speaking practitioners working with second-language English- or dialect-speaking individuals with speech and/or language difficulties. It is necessary that practitioners be aware of differences among other languages or dialects so that they can differentiate between disorders and typical differences. Awareness of linguistic and cultural differences is essential because of the increase in the number of bilingual individuals in the United States. For example, Spanish is now the second most frequently spoken language in this country (Iglesias & Anderson, 1993). In addition, it is estimated that limited proficiency with English exists for at least 14% of school-aged children (Silliman & Diehl, 2002). In addition, nearly 7.5 million persons in the U.S. from culturally and linguistically diverse groups have a disorder of either speech, language, or hearing (Battle, 2002). In spite of the increase in bilingual speakers in the United States, statistics show that there are over a thousand speech-language pathologists treating languages not spoken by them (Weiss, 2002).
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