Clinical Quandaries: A Method for Sharing Clinical Insights Following is a course description of a graduate college-based clinical practicum in speech-language pathology. We conduct a one-hour seminar once a week as an integral part of our Clinical Practicum course, during which we focus on topics relevant to the in dividual and group therapy sessions conducted by our ... Article
Article  |   October 01, 2004
Clinical Quandaries: A Method for Sharing Clinical Insights
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joyce F. West
    Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, Lehman College, City University of New York, Bronx, NY
  • Fran Redstone
    Department of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences, Lehman College, City University of New York, Bronx, NY
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Innovative Professor in Communication Sciences and Disorders
Article   |   October 01, 2004
Clinical Quandaries: A Method for Sharing Clinical Insights
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, October 2004, Vol. 7, 16-18. doi:10.1044/ihe7.2.16
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, October 2004, Vol. 7, 16-18. doi:10.1044/ihe7.2.16
Following is a course description of a graduate college-based clinical practicum in speech-language pathology.
We conduct a one-hour seminar once a week as an integral part of our Clinical Practicum course, during which we focus on topics relevant to the in dividual and group therapy sessions conducted by our students. We have found that although our academic coursework prepares students for the variousdisorders they encounter in their clinical practicum, they are often quite unprepared to deal with their clients’ difficult behavior during a therapy session. Disruptive, uncooperative, unresponsive, or labile clients are particularly challenging. Learning to handle such behavior is an important part of the learning process for beginning clinicians. We hope to enhance students’ clinical skills by asking them to describe and share what transpired in their sessions, the emotions engendered, and how they dealt with the “quandary” they encountered. This process has been used in teacher preparation courses (Griffin, 2002) to help student teachers critically assess events that take place in classrooms. Our adaptation is appropriate for one-on-one interactions, although we also include events that occur during group therapy sessions for adult patients with aphasia.
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