Development of a Model AAC Syllabus: Exploring New Competencies New ASHA standards for clinical competence (effective 1/1/05) require that graduate programs provide outcome evidence of students’ performance in specific knowledge and skill areas (ASHA, 2003). Ratcliff (2003)  systematically reviewed the changes to the ASHA standards and the impact on AAC pre-professional training in a recent article in the ... Article
Article  |   June 01, 2004
Development of a Model AAC Syllabus: Exploring New Competencies
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Joanne P. Lasker
    Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Professional Issues & Training / Articles
Article   |   June 01, 2004
Development of a Model AAC Syllabus: Exploring New Competencies
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, June 2004, Vol. 7, 25-28. doi:10.1044/ihe7.1.25
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, June 2004, Vol. 7, 25-28. doi:10.1044/ihe7.1.25
New ASHA standards for clinical competence (effective 1/1/05) require that graduate programs provide outcome evidence of students’ performance in specific knowledge and skill areas (ASHA, 2003). Ratcliff (2003)  systematically reviewed the changes to the ASHA standards and the impact on AAC pre-professional training in a recent article in the ASHA Division 12 newsletter. The first major change she described relates to the core clinical areas that need to be addressed within graduate programs. There are nine core clinical areas in which prospective speech-language pathologists must be able to describe client characteristics, perform assessment, and conduct intervention. In addition to more established areas such as articulation, fluency, voice, language, hearing (and relatively new areas, such as swallowing and social aspects of communication), the area of “communication modalities” is now listed. Specifically, communication modalities are defined as “oral, manual, augmentative and alternative communication techniques, and assistive technologies” (ASHA, 2003). The inclusion of AAC among the “Big 9” disorder areas highlights the need for relevant preservice coursework in this area.
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