Editorial It is almost inconceivable that the discipline of human communication sciences and disorders has evolved over some 75 years without the prior emergence of a dedicated entity like the Special Interest Division on Issues in Higher Education. The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association has grown to nearly 90,000 members. Given that ... Editorial
Editorial  |   June 01, 1997
Editorial
Author Notes
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Editorial
Editorial   |   June 01, 1997
Editorial
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, June 1997, Vol. 1, 3-4. doi:10.1044/ihe1.1.3
SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education, June 1997, Vol. 1, 3-4. doi:10.1044/ihe1.1.3
It is almost inconceivable that the discipline of human communication sciences and disorders has evolved over some 75 years without the prior emergence of a dedicated entity like the Special Interest Division on Issues in Higher Education. The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association has grown to nearly 90,000 members. Given that there are now multiple levels for the credentialing of practitioners in speech, language, and hearing, it is reasonable to conclude that there are well over 100,000 persons currently working who have been through an academic program for education and practicum experiences.
It is interesting that along with this growth there have been no consistent, discipline-specific, formalized exchanges about how academic preparation occurs from program to program. That is, aside from attention to macro concerns inherent in the examination of curricula and the skills and knowledge fostered on behalf of clinical certification, little formalized attention has been directed toward such reasonable topics as “best educational practices.” Global outcomes aside, how do we present subject matter in communication sciences and disorders? How do we view our responsibilities as educators; do we “teach” or do we “foster learning”? Is there a pedagogy that underlies our efforts? What works in our classrooms; what doesn’t work? It seems as if we often persist in addressing legitimate discipline-specific, academic issues from the isolated perspectives of our individual campuses. These types of questions may be among those raised over time by affiliates of Division 10.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 10 Perspectives on Issues in Higher Education content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.